2018-03-16 / Front Page

DRONE VIEW:



A March 7 aerial photo taken from a drone used by Kennebunk to assess damage following the March 4 nor’easter that coincided with astronomically high tides, shows some of the washout conditions along Beach Avenue. On Monday, March 12, Town Manager Mike Pardue said he will submit a $790,000 request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help cover the cost of repairs, to include $40,000 for debris removal, $15,000 for event mitigation efforts, including sandbagging and personnel hours, and $735,00 to fix roads, culverts and bridges, as well as the Middle Beach sea wall, which gave way and allowed continued post-storm flooding. “This period of time was extremely challenging for our staff as they staged every 12 hours to address the damages caused by each tide, while taking the steps possible to minimize the impact of the next incoming high tide,” Pardue said. “Public service and public safety personnel did an excellent job keeping the area and the public safe during this series of challenging events.” Town Engineer Chris Osterrieder said the Middle Beach wall took “extensive displacement of armor stones” and that the timber wall at Gooch’s Beach also took damage. “The combination of sea walls and stone revetments incurred various degrees of damage, but none of them were destroyed,” Osterrieder said. “The sea wall/shoreline protection assessment that the town included in the most recent capital budget deliberations is an acknowledgement that this infrastructure is a critical asset and should be evaluated and treated as such.” (Courtesy photo) A March 7 aerial photo taken from a drone used by Kennebunk to assess damage following the March 4 nor’easter that coincided with astronomically high tides, shows some of the washout conditions along Beach Avenue. On Monday, March 12, Town Manager Mike Pardue said he will submit a $790,000 request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help cover the cost of repairs, to include $40,000 for debris removal, $15,000 for event mitigation efforts, including sandbagging and personnel hours, and $735,00 to fix roads, culverts and bridges, as well as the Middle Beach sea wall, which gave way and allowed continued post-storm flooding. “This period of time was extremely challenging for our staff as they staged every 12 hours to address the damages caused by each tide, while taking the steps possible to minimize the impact of the next incoming high tide,” Pardue said. “Public service and public safety personnel did an excellent job keeping the area and the public safe during this series of challenging events.” Town Engineer Chris Osterrieder said the Middle Beach wall took “extensive displacement of armor stones” and that the timber wall at Gooch’s Beach also took damage. “The combination of sea walls and stone revetments incurred various degrees of damage, but none of them were destroyed,” Osterrieder said. “The sea wall/shoreline protection assessment that the town included in the most recent capital budget deliberations is an acknowledgement that this infrastructure is a critical asset and should be evaluated and treated as such.” (Courtesy photo)

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