2018-02-16 / Community

Linden tree at Fletcher and Main comes down

By Duke Harrington Staff Writer


A crew from Jackson’s Tree Service in Dayton removes the 75-foot Linden tree at the corner of Main and Fletcher streets Saturday. The tree had become a safety hazard at one of the busiest intersections in Kennebunk. (Dan King photo) A crew from Jackson’s Tree Service in Dayton removes the 75-foot Linden tree at the corner of Main and Fletcher streets Saturday. The tree had become a safety hazard at one of the busiest intersections in Kennebunk. (Dan King photo) One of Kennebunk’s more recognizable landmarks came down Saturday, as the town ordered the removal of the tree at the corner of Fletcher and Main streets, near Kennebunk Free Library.

The European littleleaf Linden, an ornamental flowering shade tree, was believed to be about 80 years old, said Kennebunk Tree Warden Wayne Cutting.

At the time of its demise, the tree was nearly 30 inches wide and more than 75 feet tall, but a study conducted last fall by Hughes Arbor and Land Management of Yarmouth determined it had a 5-degree lean into the intersection — an issue made precarious due to the rot in its base.

The rot stemmed from a long festering wound suffered years ago when it was clipped by a passing tractor trailer truck that had trouble negotiating the corner.

The tree committee voted last September to recommend the Linden come down after Hughes determined it could not be preserved and posed an imminent danger.

The removal had been on the back burner, but was fast tracked after last week’s storm left pieces of the tree starting to come apart and litter the street.

“It was inevitable it was going to come down anyway,” Cutting said Monday. “We decided better safe now, than sorry later.”

The removal was done by Jackson’s Tree Service of Dayton.

Selectman Blake Baldwin, liaison to the tree committee, said Jackson submitted the lower of two bids for the job.

“Nobody is happy about it when such a recognizable tree comes down, but I am confident we made a good decision in terms of public safety,” Baldwin said.

According to Cutting, the tree committee has plans to replace two disease-resistant elm trees (one of which is already gone) in front of the library, as both proved to be less hardy than initially hoped.

That should happen later this year. Cutting said he does not anticipate placing another tree in the exact spot as the lost Linden. That placement, he said, is not a great one for a tree. He said the Linden was so close to the curb because of a road widening that took place years ago.

Staff Writer Duke Harrington can be reached at news@kennebunkpost.com.

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