2017-06-30 / Community

Ship to shore


If you’re wondering on what beach this photo was taken, the clue is the window decal of the rover, HM Coast Guard. The HM stands for Her Majesty’s. The boat, known as The L’il Boat that Could, was built by students in the alternative education class at Kennebunk High School, with help from the KHS engineering class, The Landing School and Kennebunkport Conservation Trust. It was launched Dec. 29 from a Portland Fish Exchange vessel while on Georges Bank, off the Maine coast, and landed June 23 in Scotland — specifically Balivanich, Isle of Benbecula, Western Isles. After determining the boat was not a threat, the boat was handed over to a school teacher to facilitate the completion of its voyage of exploration and discovery. “The students anticipated it would land in Ireland, so Scotland was pretty close,” Superintendent Katie Hawes said. “The project has been an incredibly exciting, hands-on, opportunity for learning about teamwork, problem solving, math, science, geography, literacy and design.” Anyone interested in tacking the boats progress across the Atlantic can visit www.educationalpassages.com/ boats/00-17100681/. (Courtesy photo)If you’re wondering on what beach this photo was taken, the clue is the window decal of the rover, HM Coast Guard. The HM stands for Her Majesty’s. The boat, known as The L’il Boat that Could, was built by students in the alternative education class at Kennebunk High School, with help from the KHS engineering class, The Landing School and Kennebunkport Conservation Trust. It was launched Dec. 29 from a Portland Fish Exchange vessel while on Georges Bank, off the Maine coast, and landed June 23 in Scotland — specifically Balivanich, Isle of Benbecula, Western Isles. After determining the boat was not a threat, the boat was handed over to a school teacher to facilitate the completion of its voyage of exploration and discovery. “The students anticipated it would land in Ireland, so Scotland was pretty close,” Superintendent Katie Hawes said. “The project has been an incredibly exciting, hands-on, opportunity for learning about teamwork, problem solving, math, science, geography, literacy and design.” Anyone interested in tacking the boats progress across the Atlantic can visit www.educationalpassages.com/ boats/00-17100681/. (Courtesy photo)

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