2013-11-01 / Community

Students explore Emmons Preserve


Third- and fourth-grade students try their hand at “spinning” sheep wool as they learn about chores performed by children in the colonial days. 
(Courtesy photo) Third- and fourth-grade students try their hand at “spinning” sheep wool as they learn about chores performed by children in the colonial days. (Courtesy photo) Kate Zeller’s fourth-graders and Karen Lyman’s 3-4 multi-age students spent an early-October school day learning about colonial times at Emmons Preserve, located at the Kennebunkport Conservation Trust.

Several activities were planned throughout the day as the students learned how life was different back in colonial days.

The early-morning activities included making corn husk dolls, spinning and carding wool, caning a chair, peeling and slicing apples for apple sauce, shaking cream into butter, making soap, writing with feather and ink, and making body scrub.

After working their way through the chores and games of colonial days, the students rotated through four more stations.

Outside the 1790 Emmons house, the students learned about the architecture of that era and measured the circumference of the house.


Fourth-grade students measure a tree circumference on their waterfall walk at the Kennebunkport Conservation Trust trail. 
(Courtesy photo) Fourth-grade students measure a tree circumference on their waterfall walk at the Kennebunkport Conservation Trust trail. (Courtesy photo) Inside the Emmons house, the students were able to see the bee hive oven that was discovered behind a wall and the original beams to the upper floor, black with years of smoke and dust from the fireplace.

On the waterfall trail, students learned about the fire of 1947 and took notice of fire marks on many of the trees. Once out to the waterfall, the students used their five senses to observe their surroundings.

The final station was the beaver trail. Here students looked for evidence of beavers at the dams and downed trees, as well as their surrounding habitat.

Leia Lowery, Tom Bradbury and several Kennebunkport Conservation Trust docents gave their time and expertise to make this an educational experience that works into the students’ year -ong study of Maine.

For more information, please contact amurray@rsu21.net.

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